Thursday, September 17, 2015

PLN #4

Summary

In the article “Child Nutrition -- Start to a Virtuous Circle” by Bjørn Lomborg they are talking about how your nutrition growing up can affect the rest of you life. Children that don’t get the necessary amounts of food are shown that they are lower than the expected height and fall behind in developing their cognitive skills. In Brazil, a study showed that 1% height increase raised average adult earnings by 2.4%. As people’s kids start to grow older, they realize that just spending a small amount of money on providing nutritional supplements and having a balanced diet can really pay off in the end for their children. In Indonesia, people have realized that they get back up to $166 of benefits for every one dollar spent.


Response
I believe that children really do need a good nutrition and diet while growing up. The types of foods you eat can really form your learning or appearance when you get older. As it says in the article, “the first 1,000 days of a child’s life -- from conception to age two -- are vital for proper development.” I completely agree, because as you’re getting older and everything is growing. It is important to eat the right things, sleep enough, and take care of yourself. I can believe that kids don’t eat the right things don’t develop their cognitive skills, because think about it, your brain might not get fully developed or something else. I think it’s really important to give your child’s early ages everything you’ve got since it can affect them in the future.  It also says that “Stunted children do less well at school and lead poorer adult lives.” In my opinion, it’s worth it to spend $150 for healthy baby food for about a month. As it is said in the story, Professor Susan Horton from University of Waterloo and professor John Hoddinott from Cornell have concluded that “every dollar spent on nutrition in the first 1,000 days of a child's life can give a saving of an average $45 and in some cases as much as $166.” What do you think about a child’s nutrition?

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